Thom Atkinson - 18th-century Medical Artifacts (from the Wellcome Collection, London)

1. Phrenological Heads

2. Case of Glass Eyes

3. Amputation Saws

4. Assorted Syringes 

5. Sir Hiram Maxim’s Pipe of Peace

6. Medicine Chest

The Jigsaw Murders Case

On September 14, 1935, Buck Ruxton, a physician who lived in Lancashire, near the English-Scottish border, murdered his wife Isabella and her maid Mary Rogerson, and then mutilated their bodies and scattered the parts, in an effort to make them unidentifiable.

After a passerby discovered some remains under a bridge in Scotland, a team of forensic experts was assembled.

Using an array of scientific methods, the experts identified the victims and unmasked the perpetrator.

The painstaking reconstruction of the bodies of Isabella Ruxton and Mary Rogerson by forensic pathologist John Glaister Jr. and anatomist James Couper Brash—and pioneering use of photographic superimpositions—was the key evidence that led to Dr. Ruxton’s conviction and execution.

The success of the methods used in the Ruxton case, which was widely reported in the press, led to increased public and professional trust in the capabilities of forensic science.”

Monotropa Uniflora

"Also known as the ghost plantIndian pipe, or corpse plant. 

Unlike most plants, it is white and does not contain chlorophyll. Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is parasitic, more specifically a myco-heterotroph. Its hosts are certain fungi that are mycorrhizal with trees, meaning it ultimately gets its energy from photosynthetic trees. Since it is not dependent on sunlight to grow, it can grow in very dark environments as in the understory of dense forest. It is often associated with beech trees. 

The complex relationship that allows this plant to grow also makes propagation difficult.

The plant is sometimes completely white but commonly has black flecks and a pale pink coloration. Rare variants may have a deep red color.”

How not to vomit, tip no. 1:

Do not eat the strawberry cheesecake your friends left in your fridge directly after half a pound of boiled collard greens with onions. Just don’t do it. 

Richard Harrington
Abandoned NASA trailer, found somewhere between LA & Vegas

Richard Harrington

Abandoned NASA trailer, found somewhere between LA & Vegas

Cairlinn - Bahamas- Nassau- Bay Street- Burns House (2004)

Cairlinn - Bahamas- Nassau- Bay Street- Burns House (2004)

Albert von Schrenck-Notzing
"Schrenck-Notzing was a German physician, psychiatrist and notable psychic researcher, who devoted his time to the study of paranormal events connected with mediumship, hypnotism and telepathy.
He investigated the medium Eva Carrière and believed the ectoplasm she produced was genuine. However, Schrenck-Notzing did not believe her ectoplasm ‘materializations’ were anything to do with spirits; he claimed they were the result of ‘ideoplasty’ in which the medium could form images onto ectoplasm from her mind. 
He published the book Phenomena of Materialisation in English translation (1920), which included photographs of the ectoplasm. 
Critics pointed out the photographs revealed marks of magazine cut-outs, pins and a piece of string.”

Albert von Schrenck-Notzing

"Schrenck-Notzing was a German physician, psychiatrist and notable psychic researcher, who devoted his time to the study of paranormal events connected with mediumship, hypnotism and telepathy.

He investigated the medium Eva Carrière and believed the ectoplasm she produced was genuine. However, Schrenck-Notzing did not believe her ectoplasm ‘materializations’ were anything to do with spirits; he claimed they were the result of ‘ideoplasty’ in which the medium could form images onto ectoplasm from her mind. 

He published the book Phenomena of Materialisation in English translation (1920), which included photographs of the ectoplasm.

Critics pointed out the photographs revealed marks of magazine cut-outs, pins and a piece of string.”

Septim themes