Smoke Ring - 1,000 feet wide, after demo shot, Al Anbar Province, Iraq (2005)

Smoke Ring - 1,000 feet wide, after demo shot, Al Anbar Province, Iraq (2005)

Trevor Paglen - They Watch the Moon (2010)

"This photograph depicts a classified ‘listening station’ deep in the forests of West Virginia.

The station is located at the center of the National Radio Quiet Zone, a region of approximately 34,000 square kilometers in West Virginia and parts of Maryland.

Within the Quiet Zone, radio transmissions are severely restricted: omnidirectional and high-powered transmissions (such as wireless internet devices and FM radio stations) are not permitted.

The listening station, which forms part of the global ECHELON system, was designed in part to take advantage of a phenomenon called moonbounce.

Moonbounce involves capturing communications and telemetry signals from around the world as they escape into space, hit the moon, and are reflected back towards Earth.

The photograph is a long exposure under the full moon light.”

James L. - Lenticular Clouds Over Mt. Rainier (2004)

James L. - Lenticular Clouds Over Mt. Rainier (2004)

Klaus Leidorf - Chapel and Ground Station Near Raisting (2006)

Klaus Leidorf - Chapel and Ground Station Near Raisting (2006)

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

Yosemite Firefall

"The Yosemite Firefall was a summertime event that began in 1872 and continued for almost a century, in which burning hot embers were spilled from the top of Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park to the valley 3,000 feet below.

It was conducted by the owners of the Glacier Point Hotel. The firefalls ended in January 1968 when the National Park Service ordered it to stop because of the overwhelming number of visitors it attracted, plus the fact that it was not a natural event. The hotel itself was destroyed by fire one year later and was not rebuilt.

The Firefalls were performed at 9pm seven nights a week.”

Septim themes